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Reno, NV 89509
United States

We started on Maui, the Valley Isle, bringing the aloha spirit of harmony between people and nature into our women's clothing made for beach, town, and travels near and far. Feel the difference of heritage textiles, natural materials, and exotic touch of far-off destinations.

Sensitive Skin

For most people, choosing their clothing is a matter of style preferences, size choices, and budget. For people with sensitive skin, there is the added challenge of finding fabrics that are compatible with their particular allergy or condition. Unfortunately, most clothing available on the market has one or more potential pitfalls in the way it's made that may cause reactions. A little digging can reveal a treasure trove of information that may help pinpoint the best choices for specific sensitivities.

Clothing Concerns and Solutions for Women with sensitive skin

For most people, choosing their clothing is a matter of style preferences, size choices, and budget. For people with sensitive skin, there is the added challenge of finding fabrics that are compatible with their particular allergy or condition. Unfortunately, most clothing available on the market has one or more potential pitfalls in the way it's made that may cause reactions. A little digging can reveal a treasure trove of information that may help pinpoint the best choices for specific sensitivities.


The Wardrobe 2-Step

While your clothing labels give you the fiber content of your fabric, such as cotton or polyester, they don't necessarily tell you about the scouring agents, bleaches, resins, or dyes that your clothes were made with. For some women, fiber content is critical. For others, it's a dye or resin used on the fiber. The first step is getting to know your fibers, the second step involves a little more info on what types of chemicals those fibers were processed with.


have you read your closet lately? Fiber, fabric, find your favorite!

Most people already know the kinds of fabrics they love to wear. Cotton t-shirts are a frequent favorite, and wool tends to be a love-it-or-hate it choice because for some it sets off the "itch factor". If you haven't checked your labels lately, it's worth a quick read through your closet to see what fibers are in the clothes you love and wear the most.

Your Fiber Genre

Looking beyond just style, is there a theme to the fabrics that you consistently use and wear? Some people find that polyester just doesn't breathe enough for their skin and makes them feel clammy. For others, it's a certain fabric thickness, regardless of the fiber type, that they love or hate. You may find you just never wear an item that doesn't have spandex stretch to it. But for those women with sensitive skin, this goes beyond preference into what may be causing reactions.

Artificial Intelligence?

Choosing natural fibers often helps cut down on skin reactions. Fibers like cotton, linen, silk, and wool are from plant and animal sources. Synthetic fibers like polyester, acrylic, nylon, and spandex are made from petroleum. Some people have petroleum sensitivities, and a completely synthetic fabric will set off skin flare-ups. For others, the challenges with synthetic fibers are that they tend to retain heat and moisture, which can exacerbate skin conditions. Synthetic's suitability to sports gear and stretch fabrics means that items made with synthetics have a closer, body-hugging fit, which can compound the problem. Looking for clothes with a higher natural fiber content can improve the breathability of your clothing and cut down on skin misery.

The Tag Paradox

Of course, these labels, while a wonderful source of information on fibers, may be an irritant for some people. Sometimes a tagless garment is essential for certain skin conditions, yet the selection of tagless garments on the market does not often extend to dress shirts, cocktail attire, suits, etc. In fact, most woven fabrics will have tags because of the nature of trying to print label information successfully directly onto the fabric; it just doesn't work well for all fabric types. Companies are not supposed to import, export, or sell with zero information given about the content or care of their clothing, so on the tags go. While surfing your closet for skin suspects, see if you are a tagless type.


BUT EVEN MY COTTON SHIRT is killing me

This is where all those chemicals come in. It turns out that not all fabrics, even when they're made from the same basic fiber, are created equal. We have entered the world where your label information starts to fail you, and some common clothing manufacturing practices must be revealed.

Organics Beyond Food

We're becoming much more informed as a society about why food grown with no pesticides and no chemical fertilizers is beneficial for our soil, waterways, and body health. For some people, organic fabric is a big factor in how their skin feels. Just like food, fibers like cotton and linen are grown in fields, and the amount and type of chemical input into those fibers can make a difference in the ultimate feel of the fabric on the skin. Fewer chemicals equals fewer potential irritants to delicate skin.

The Nontoxic Necessity

Why use organic fabric if you're only going to process it with harsh chemicals and irritating dyes? Nontoxic processing and dyeing agents are essential in maintaining the benefit of organic fabric for sensitive skin. A category of dye known as "azo" dyes are common culprits in episodes of contact dermatitis, and unfortunately they are pretty prevalent in the clothing we wear. Look for companies that specifically use "low-impact" dyes, meaning dyes without heavy metals, azo compounds, or formaldehyde. It goes beyond "the environment" to your environment, and what level of comfort makes the difference in your day.

The No-Iron No-Go

While we all love the convenience of wrinkle-resistant, no-iron clothing, the formaldehyde resins used to tame your fabric into smooth shape may be an irritant for certain skin conditions, particularly for those with eczema. If sacrificing a little convenience means a lot of relief, it may be worth your while to stop wearing these items for a while and see if it helps calm things down.


I still can't wear anything

In that case, what are you washing and drying your clothes with? Sadly, some of our cleaning and freshening solutions can actually pack a wallop of chemical input that ends up in unhappy skin. If you're cleaning your clothes with blue pods, trendy scents, and fabric softener, you're actually adding dyes, alcohols, and chemicals to your clothing. You may want to switch to a clear, biodegradable laundry wash and see if you feel a difference. The more natural and gentle the cleaning agent, the less likely you'll experience irritation.

For some people, having anything at all on their skin produces a reaction of one kind or another, whether it's a rash, or pain, or itchiness. This is especially true when going through certain medical treatments. It's also a fact of life for a certain percentage of people who have multiple, severe skin sensitivities. So far, as is always true with clothing, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to getting the equation right, but more companies are addressing specialty needs as the awareness grows.